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20121222
20121230
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CSPAN2 78
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00am EST
an effective curriculum to prepare us for life? teach us about politics? [inaudible] education and [inaudible] which can be achieved in a year? or do you want to drag out the campaign making public transport cheaper, better, and assessable for all? for at least another year? it's your decision. [applause] >> thank you very much indeed. we have two great speeches to get us to a cracking start. and i'm not looking for contributions from the floor, yes. the first person i saw was the young woman there. [inaudible conversations] >> yes. start by saying name and area. >> from north york shire. as we're awear and public transport is a big issue [inaudible] and again this is debate. i'm from north york shire we run the -- [inaudible] this summer which allows young people to travel on buses for one pound for a whole day. the scheme was a great achievement it was only one county wide and by the north -- [inaudible] council therefore we came across many barriers for a staff not all of us complete -- [inaudible] and when they did it was often on their own term. in addition it was very hard for us to pro
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
administration running education programs for after being chancellor the university of colorado boulder people said was the first woman to be a the stage at a research university. i had a fight with ronald reagan even though i was a commissioner one of my latino women was the only other minority we would dissent when they would try to do something that was terrible. we had a big fight with him but i went to all of those. >>host: but president carter appointed you? >> yes. then there is a new department of education and i went back to teaching and that i was appointed. >>host: when did the clear it would be a permanent agency? >>guest: after the first year. the commission was set of sitting down to say we will just served, they did some hearings. the major power the commission has, when it does what it is supposed to do, it will listen to people and civil rights problems that they could not get anyone to pay attention. the federal government. nobody would pay attention. the first year they would go out and listen to the people. they have the power to subpoena any one. eisenhower said i want to
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
to make a positive contribution to society a fair access to education, employment and =tranfour and indeed discrimination is the real challenge we face. let's let them give us the opportunities they deserve. [applause] >> jack, thank you bring much indeed for the beach. i am looking for a contributor from the east midlands. whoever thought? please, welcome. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i agree with my fellow same-sex marriage is an highly important issue and is widely spoken about as at present the case it would be one of our debates today. however, i feel it is a nonpowered young people can agree. many kids in my constituency when i consorted them said yes it is the highest important topic. but when i went back to front of this county said they would want to see campaign. that shows that it was at the moment something being done about it. the mission of the government are saying in part of their manifestoes they want is to have been by 2015. i feel there is a more important issue in the debate last. they restarted their curriculum and now isn't the right time to look at same-sex marriage. t
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message from the prime minister, from yorkshire. [applause] member of the parliament, i'm -- [inaudible] we are -- this is your opportunity to debate -- by more than [inaudible] 260,000 people. -- [inaudible] include -- [inaudible] the children and the people. he has -- [inaudible] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
world employing tens of thousands of less educated workers. a wonderful recipe for short-run productivity, a wonderful recipe for paying worker $5 a day. it was factories like this that made detroit quite possibly the most productive place on the planet in the '50s, but these were not a recipe for long-run urban regeneration because they don't need the city, they don't give to the city. they're a world unto themselves. when conditions change, and they always change, you just move the factories to places where it's cheaper. you have nothing left. and so as transportation costs declined, we moved these factories to lower cost locale, we moved them to the suburbs, we moved them to the right-to-work states and across the country. now, detroit still has not recovered from deindustrialization. in part, detroit had the worst of all possible worlds, it had a single large industry, a few dominant firms. those firms crowded out all local entrepreneurship, and the city has had a significant degree of problems ever since. they have 25% -- they've lost 25% of their population between
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
't do anything useful just like a newborn is limited in skill, without an education or supporting the paradigm for a i, artificial intelligence, to educate them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neocortex is as opposed to the brain? >> guest: the old brain and the new brain. the new brain is the neocortex. only mammals have the neocortex. these early mammals emerged over 1 hundred million years ago, the neocortex is the size of a postage stamp and is basically the outer layer, neocortex means new rind, of the brain and capable of thinking in a hierarchical fashion. >> host: that is the part of the brain you are focusing on. >> caller: -- >> guest: it has complexity 2. twenty-nine and change quickly they were able to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, somethi
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:05pm EST
of scholarship and education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, and champions of literature. however one defines knowledge economy today it could not have emerged, is not worth sustaining without the production and distribution of books, journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there's copyright. senator keating called copyright the jugular of the book publishing industry. when maria said that earlier this year, i thought i have got to use that, a tribute that to her. and i certainly would not do otherwise. but it seems to me to sum up very much what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. there are a lot of publishers who care a lot more about making books than they do about making money. but given the structure of the industry there has to be return. one of the big six did say to me i gamble with other people's money. that is particularly true of the trade sector, the consumer sector where every book is different and you don't know what is going to work and what is not but it also applies to some extent to
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
with education. many big school districts across the country are struggling with the problem of low achievement, low academic achievement and motivation especially among the kids that come from families and backgrounds where they were not encouraged from a young age to read and learn. the school districts some of them are experimenting with cash incentives to motivate academic achievement. paying their kids to get a good grade to score well on the standardized exams they tried this in new york city, washington, d.c. and chicago. in dallas they tried offering second graders to dollars for each book they read it's a promising idea that people are not very happy about it but let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion to the if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many things it is a good idea worth trying and how many of you would object in principle? let's see first how many of you would object? how many of you would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think that it's worth trying? all righ
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:30am EST
was not to convert them, but to educate them. and to improve their lives and tangible ways because that's what they responded to positively. once he had the inside, he had what became the greatest university of her release. >> isn't still open? >> it is. it weathered many tech theories, but it remains open and stay that way. >> who owns it, who rents it? >> it is still run by a very impressive faculty of professors and administrators who are middle easterners and american. daniel liss and peter gorman who is a psychologist by training and shared with the important departments at the university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 12:00pm EST
'm going true this, and i feel hopeless and helpless, and i don't know what to do, from educators writing in and saying we don't know how to handle this. we don't have the tools to respond to this. and we decided at that time to start meeting the kids and families and educators who are really on the front lines of this issue. >> host: so why -- what's the difference between, like, teasing and bullying? is, is everything bad that happens to a kid bullying, or is it, is there some, like, global definition of bullying that really works? >> guest: yeah. yeah, i think everyone will be teased, and i think that we all in our lives tease each other. i think that there's, there are things that are, you know, good nature,ed, and teasing is part f our way of communicating with each other. and not all bullying, not every fight is a case of bullying. there are instances where there will be conflict where two kids may fight, there'll be violence, and that's not necessarily bullying. it is bullying when there's an indifference in power, when the target does not have the ability to make it stop, when it
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
, we need stem education, and, absolutely, i think we do, but we shouldn't underestimate this sense of practical skill that are often passed down from generation, the people of fire who actually are doing things on the factory floor that account for a lot of globe's most successful innovation when it comes to fire suits. one of the pieces, as i said, is that our democratic culture in the business world gives us this competitive advantage of o more authoritarian manufacturing structure, particularly small and medium sized businesses because that allows them to economize production, and that allows them to customize products. the second thesis in the book is tracing a support of manufacturing back in american history, and the idea there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing, ten pages, and me makes the argument. he says in a world where we are
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
. describe the whole sense in education program. >> was that experience like? >> well, it is such an emotional , thrilling to more rewarding experience, both for my wife and i to teach these young men and some of them older, people who have committed heinous crimes, murder, what have you. they see the error of their ways and turn things around. that education process as well as the minister program is extremely important. a major name of one sort. warren buffett was there a few years ago because his sister, as a matter of fact, is a major supporter of hudson, the nonprofit organization. the year to this graduation ceremony and it's just incredible. opening and closing prayers. the old bible or what have you. they always have a valedictorian get up representing the graduates. usually maybe 20, 30 students who are graduating in ssc it's our best agree. and the valedictorian gets up and says, you know, i started off my parents own mother, the great hopes for me. then i got in the wrong crowd. i got into drugs are what have you. and then he says, and then i killed a man. a
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not.
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
to go to at that time. but she very much wanted us to get educated. >> host: windier member been interested in public policy and there is a government? >> guest: when i started doing legal history at michigan and started leading all the legal history staff, did a dissertation about the draft that was enacted during the civil war, the first national draft act. from reading the documents i read, all the materials generated by government agencies and even legal history of the law at the very concerned about how power is exercised and whether there's a voice for people not in power. how did the powerless get somebody to listen to them which is what i love so much about the commission because i was insisting on listening to people. when you go to san antonio, texas and was the first hearing the commission had held on the tenets that i write about in the book. there'll these latinos who nobodies listen to them in case they were kicked out of school because they spoke spanish and was told was a dirty language. all these people, education was awful. we listen to them. when you go and rea
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
are holding onto as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy, and i would hope that whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply, deeply focused on adult learning, and of education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> counselor? >> i would concur on those points. i'm grateful i live in a state that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of those percentages, and people that has been struggling and people living in poverty. if you talk about the shrinking middle class, who were the joining? and so i want a president and governor and a major that believes in making those critical investment in physical infrastructure and in people that support the rule t
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and misery on battlefields from shiloh sharpsburg, do you bridge to fredericksburg. most of all though, 1862 was the year lincoln rose to greatness. never since the founding of the country has so much depended on the judgment, the cunning, the timing and the sheer physical endurance of one man. now how lincoln survived and ultimately triumphed through 1862 is a very good story but it takes a whole book to tell. tonight i would like to talk for a few minutes with you about why lincoln poured everything he had into the struggle. why was it so important to him to save the union? why fight a war that cost more american lives than all of our other wars put together? three-quarters of a million people dead and countless more wounded in body and in mind. to understand this story, i must take you back another 50 plus years before 1862, to a winter day in febru
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:00am EST
will find it educational, it is short and brief and i know everybody likes that. i want to thank you for hosting this discussion today, and thank our panelists for coming and sharing your thoughts on this perspective. >> only one thing, two things actually. one is fill out those evaluations and second, manifest what patricia was talking about in thanking the panel, great discussion today. [applause] >> and for doing that so well we will free you from the obligation to come to anymore alliance seminars this year. had been new year. >> this year the senior senator from texas kay bailey hutchison decided not to run for reelection. first elected in 1993 she served three turned in the u.s. senate and will be succeeded by newly elected senator ted cruise. on wednesday senator hutchison gave her farewell speech. it is half an hour. >> i rise today to address this chamber for possibly the last time a senior senator from the great state of texas. i have to say it is an ironic note that if i had given my farewell address last week, there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capital
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 9:00am EST
, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that there are any eggal benefits. -- educational benefits. but i think it's also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is leaning this way, that even if there are some educational went fits -- benefits, they've got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination, right? i mean, something as compelling, something, if an interest is compelling, you've got to consider the inherent liabilities in the racial discriminatio
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
. and to give them land and to give them livestock into pay for the transportation and education, transportation especially to someplace where they could live undisturbed as free people. and it's interesting, when this bit of information came out in the smithsonian magazine an excerpt from the book, a number of people said to me that they had never heard of it. and i said i never heard of it either until i stumbled across this in philadelphia. and a couple people have thought about this. the parlor game when you hope your book is being made into a movie, who do want to start in it, people began to say i wonder whom he could free? people thought of john and priscilla hemings. they said well, maybe he could have freed some of his farmers, and then someone said, the faucets. he could've freed joe. you was a blacksmith. and ed was his cook and had a whole bunch of children. and it turned out any auction of jefferson's estate after the war, and after his death, joseph was in 13. jefferson left the rest of the family in slavery, and they're scattered to different masters. and joseph worked for 10 year
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 5:00pm EST
in there was the beautiful memoir last year how do we create educational opportunities for the families that will not take care of them who have been told you were broke and? were they will reject them because they are gay or lesbian? merisel lost college feels like another planet it. we read about the game changing things that nonprofits are doing to create is goals there is a program here and is connected to the drop in center for disconnected youth that school was started with the notion there are young people who feel marginalized. can you get them to come and? at the filenet -- house we run ever only those who have spent expelled they did not cite fan the best and brightest these are schools for kids who are the best and brightest but rejected from the mainstream system. there is not a lot of those. we know of just a handful and we think more of that would create opportunity if you look at the labor statistics kids with the high-school diploma are much more likely to find work than those new to not. getting kid to cross that bridge is for those that work with young people. those who are homeless in t
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00pm EST
. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make it without being expelled. he is c
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
this stuff also about the educational stuff like the policy-making situations which i'm very interested in. it's a great thing washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span has covered it. >> c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the eco
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different angle. that is why not study the person that knew them the best? for example what possibly could i as an historian could should be to the body of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or th
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all," should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency, and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it. when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground, and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thub voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and it seems that the word "poverty
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:45pm EST
. the degree to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched wha
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
votes and cut those deals in part because of his lifelong political education. he began it as a young man in well yams burg, he listened to patrick henry said -- he spoke of henry, he spoke as homer wrote and loved that, partly because he couldn't do it. it's always a good sign when they recognize qualities in orrs which they don't pez. that kind of humility, however relative that term is in talking about this species called politicians is a virtue. he learned how to master the ways and means of politics because of that disastrous governorship. i think he was much faster to react to louisiana when the purchase became open and a possibility. as you'll remember, basically, napoleon is going to sell this to us, one of the great real estate deals ever. and jefferson immediately in 1803 begins to think, well, we're going to have to amend the constitution to do it because he was a strict constructionist, right? he had followed alexander hamilton over broad presidential powers. then about the third week of august, 1803 -- that was the fourth of july. about the third or week of august he gets
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 6:00pm EST
to do before. c-span: how much education did your father have? >> guest: he never went to college. he went to high school in pasadena. his father had found someone to manage the ranch, eventually, and the family had moved to pasadena. c-span: pasadena--what state? >> guest: california. c-span: california. >> guest: and my father went through high school in pasadena and he had wanted to go to stanford, and it was at the time of world war i, and two things happened. my father was drafted briefly before the end of world war i, although he never saw military action because it ended. and his father died. and my father was sent out to the ranch to try to keep the lid on things... c-span: how much education... >> guest: ... while the estate was settled. c-span: i'm sorry. how much education did your mother have? >> guest: my mother had a degree from the university of arizona, and she had taught school, grade school, i think, for a while in el paso. c-span: so when did you--given that atmosphere at that ranch and all the newspapers and magazines coming out, when did you begin to form your own
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:15am EST
control. why all of this for one african-american student who wanted to get an education at a brand name university it's because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, from the statehouse itself down to the 11-year-old who were throwing bricks at us in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem. even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was your insurrection. lasted two or three days. the violent part of it. and then after that i was appointed to be the security officer for james meredith and went to school with him, or he went to school, i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers, and we were there throughout the year. we transferred back and forth. the army was in place for almost a year until he graduated in august, 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all-white neighborhood in south min yapless, john -- minneapolis. a few italians, but that was pretty much it. so it was an eye opening for me. but, again, we were trained, and i am is so proud of what the army did. when you write a book -- this is my first -- the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
started out as an easiest, then became a collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the originals found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to collect the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
involved in another political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for vice president with governor gary johnson. it's amazing because she from a totally different perspective has come out to pretty much the same analysis that i have on all these important issues like education. today the talk you were wearing, and i like it by the way, deutsch shows how much to spend, where to go, what to buy. like all other consumer goods that is how we get reasonable bids for reasonable prices that education is completely different than that. it is funded from the top up so the federal government thinks of this money keeps a bunch of it and gives it to the state and keep a bunch of it for their administrative costs and give it to the school districts, give it to the schools, the use a lot of administrative costs
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00am EST
, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness we have to address. when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in affluent neighborhoods, and they say those words, "liberty and justice for all," when they pledge allegiance to the flag, that should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real, but right now, we are lacking that sense of or jen ji, and we can't sit around waiting on elected leaders to do it. when i think about elected movements in america, i don't think they were led to elected officials. elected officials respond to the leadership on the ground. that's what we should be doing. when we think about voting conversations to debate, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and seems that the word "poverty" was almost something we shouldn't talk about? something we shouldn't address. i hope we can change the dialogue because i'm a guy who actually likes to do a balance sheet analysis of our country. th
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
to the education of our children and the health of the market. .. [applause] our coverage of the international summit of the book continues now by a panel called the publishing world yesterday and today. it about one hour 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and supplement. it's a pleasure see so many of you, so many old friends here. i have a great privilege of being senior consultant for the librarian of congress, and i am also a writer and editor in chief and the world. and also a veteran of the publishing world. i have worked for many years as a senior editor and also at simon & schuster as well. i have been around the block. a bit of a veteran in august. but we have learned so many things in this conference so far. such a delight in such a pleasure to have heard the wonderful keynote speech. the report from the frontline with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discussion. it is w
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm EST
as her husband, lizzie was much better educated having attended both elementary and boarding schools and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing this exceedingly capable woman couldn't do from layingly knoll yum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away in england, and later she helped to run the mill's boarding house. she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there was no economic reason for her to be absorbing these responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and development. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, but lizzie had raised his children as her own and given birth to eight more as well. of these ten children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of accomplishment, all were thriving. nelly and nina, 23 and 20, had grown into smart, educated youn
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
advocates and his godfather was the cardinal james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a camp
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:30pm EST
at the catholic school and the north side of chicago where my firstborn started his education, the school is an american rainbow. african, polish, mexican, croatian, you name it, it's there all gathered at the christmas pageant. standing on the rickety stage gleefully parading about in a santa hats. talking to his friend, the chinese grow with the white mom and pakistan. i am cooling in the year of our newborn baby when the signal comes in the class starts in on their signs on. a little wobbly and first, what they catch the swing soon enough, and when they hit the course i cannot help myself. i start to sing along. i love this melody. i love this side of my sweet kid among all these other sweet kids. hammer and bring-your are i felt on my first fight in a redwood forest, the adrenaline pumping through my veins . my sons will make their own memories. one day they will realize just what it means that this land is their land and that they share it with 310 million others. it when my baby will come crying in the middle of the nine would walk up and down the hallway singing this song. a long t
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:45am EST
of chicago where my firstborn started his education. the school is an american rainbow, african, polish, mexican, croatian, indian, you name it it's there. they're all gathered at the christmas pageant, the three-year-olds are standing on the rickety stage gleefully parading about in the santa hats. my son is talking to his friend lisa, the chinese girl with a white mom and the pakistani and. i am cooing in the air of our newborn baby when the signal comes and the class starts in on their assigned some. it's a little wobbly at first but they catch the swing soon enough, and when they hit the chorus i can't help myself. i start to sing along. i love this melody. i love the sight of my sweet kid among all these other sweet kids. i'm remembering the sheer all i felt him at first sight in a redwood forest, the adrenaline pumping through my veins when inhaled my first taxi on the new york island. my sons will make their own memories on this blessed patch of earth. one day, they will realize just what it means that this land is their land, and that they share with 310 million others. when my
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
were on our site. the idea was the state cannot make an educational opportunity available for one sex only. in any event, that left justice scalia as the lone dissenter in the vmi case. now, the case about the family medical leave act and the chiefs understanding that it was important not to make this a maternity leave, that it should be part of the workers life when you have a sick child, a sick spouse, a sick parent, you can take time off for that putting did the job in jeopardy. well, i'd like to say that i had something to do with it. i don't think that's too. i think a case that came before the court influenced him. but most of all, i think he was influenced by his granddaughte granddaughters. one of his daughters was divorced and she had two girls, and the old chief cut took responsibility for being a male parent figure for those girls. they loved him, and i think he, he thought about how he would like the world to be for them. >> when you think about this evolution, starting really didn't read versus reed in 1971, which was a case involving an idaho probate law that said males
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am EST
house" which lays out a radical vision of education in the future of america, and the marriage of traditional classroom and digital technology, employing them in a way that flips our traditional model of education. >> by the way, carn appeared on our afterwards program so if you want to watch that author, type in his name. long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> long history. we published christopher, "god is not great" in 2007. a number one "new york times" best seller. after that book we published his first memoir, followed last september by an essay collection called "arguably." also went on to be a best seller, but together under extreme circumstances. he was very ill at the time. we hoped to publish a book -- a long are -- longer book about his illness but we corrected the article for vanity fair. >> you're going to be at the miami book fair next week, november 17th, 18th, along with carol blue, and martin amos. >> that's going to be a really interesting panel to be on. martin and christopher knew each other for a very long time. carol and martin are very clos
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:45pm EST
for not contributing to their education. whereupon the jailer and his wife made several racist comments about why would you want to try to educate them? so this became kind of part of attention. the little girls were put into a different category and then there was later on a battle over who should lead their proper -- who should be in charge of their lives basically and they were moved legally. the imus.africans in the abolitionists moved them from the household of the jailer and they wanted the abolitionists close to the africans. the question was, did they also go back to sierra leone? c.'s they get on all three of the girls remained with them for many years and margaret, right there. she actually came back to the united states and became the first black female graduate of -- college and went back to sierra leone as a missionary herself. most of the adult men were able to find their families and actually did what they wanted to do when they went back. they wanted to go back to their lives. there is a tragic counterpoint for sink it. when he got back he was searching for his wife and three children a
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
or nothing guy, and kennedy gets the picture. it's part of the education with kennedy. what i like about kennedy is he was raw and green, but he learned on the ground. he was bullied at the vienna summit, a rough summer with berlin, but he learned, and by the time of the cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. listen to the tapes of the missile crisis, and i have for a book i wrote on bobby kennedy, after the tapes, kennedy sounds great. president kennedy, particularly on the last day, the 13th day everybody's getting nervous, you hear voices getting squeaky, president kennedy is cool understanding we need a deal, russians, secretly, but have to make a deal with them, and thank god there was a couple years to learn on the job, and because he did in the end handle the crisis well. some of the education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors. we are joi
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
that picture. and it's part of the education of john f. kennedy. one thing i like about president kennedy, he was raw, he was green, but he did learn on the job. he was bullied by kruschev in 1961, he had a rough summer in berlin, but he learned. and by the time to have cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. you listen to the tapes, and i have for a book i wrote about bobby kennedy, half of the sessions are taped, president kennedy's great. particularly on the last day, the 13th day when everybody's starting to get a little nervous, you can hear the voices get a little squeaky, president kennedy is cool. and he understands we have to make a deal with the russians. we have to do it secretly, but we have to make a deal with them. and thank god he had a couple of years to learn on the job, because he did in the end handle the crisis well. and some of his education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >> visit the author's web site, evanthomasbooks.com. >> with a month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end lists
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his reti
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united stat
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm EST
for not contributing to their education. whereupon the jailer and wife made several racist comments, you know, about why would you want to try to educate these monkeys anyway? this became part of the tension, but the little girls #w-r put into a different category, and then there was, later on, a very big battle over who should be their proper -- who should be in charge of their lives basically, and were removed from the household of the jailer, and then then lived with an abolitionist close to the african himself. >> [inaudible] >> the question was did they go back to sierra leone? yes, they did. all three little girls remained with the mission for many years, and, right there, she actually came back to the united states and became, i do believe, the first black female graduate of overland college. then went back to sierra leone as a missionary herself. most found their families and did what they wanted to do when they got back. they wanted to go back to their lives. there's a continue -- a tragic point for sinke when searching for his wife and children, he found the village was completely destroye
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
education in the 1920s was in general thought to be pursuing that for her own personal betterment, and not for the purpose of having a career. was to become a better life, a better homemaker, a better mother in the future. that was the object of post secondary education, primarily. women did go into the teaching profession, and so carson certainly could've been a teacher. she could've taught biology, or writing eventually for that matter. that would've been a career avenue that would've been open to a. science was also more open to women than other disciplines were. the marine biological laboratory at, was a place where a lot of prominent women scientists study. one of carson's predecessors was another person who went on to actually become a writer, gertrude stein spent a couple of summers studying marine biology, which i find kind of interesting. but yes, carson's prospects would've a very circumscribed by the fact that she was a woman. i was talking order today with someone about her role and whether there was something that was gender oriented about the fact that she was really
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 7:00pm EST
. their gun safety, marksmanship and hunter education programs have set the standard for well over a century. over the past 25 years, their eddie eagle gun safe program has taught over 26 million kids that real guns aren't toys, and today child gun accidents are at the lowest levels ever recorded. school safety is a complex issue with no simple, single solution. but i believe trained, qualified, armed security is one key component among many that can provide the first line of difference as well as the last line of defense. again, i welcome the opportunity to serve this vital, potentially life saving effort. thank you very much. >> asa, thank you. >> [inaudible] >> as i indicated, as i indicated at the outset, this is the beginning of a serious conversation. we won't be taking questions today, but andrew and -- [inaudible] our public affairs officer is here. we will be willing to talk to anybody beginning on monday. a text of the speech by wayne and asa hutchinson's remarks are available at nra.org. i want to thank all of you for being with us, and i look forward to talking to you and answeri
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